What is the difference between paid and unpaid journals?

A journal which charges the author for publication of their article in the journal is called a paid journal. And as the name suggests, a journal which does not charge any amount for publication of paper in the journal is called an unpaid journal. Unpaid journals sometimes charge the readers to access their articles and hence cover their expenses. In general, unpaid journals are considered to be better than paid journals. This is because of the fact that the paid journals publish articles of lower quality so that they may charge the author and increase their revenue. However, this is not always the case. Many reputed journals may also charge the author for publishing their articles.

In general, the revenue generated by paid journals is quite high, hence they employ a large number of reviewers to check their articles. Hence, the review time and overall publishing time is quite low. this is not the case for unpaid journals. They usually have a publishing time ranging from 3 to 6 months. Due to the large number of paid journals adopting these malpractices to increase their revenue, many institutions have now started to focus on only unpaid journals, i.e. they do not credit the author with quality research if the paper is published in a paid journal. Hence, it may be a time for authors to consider publishing only in unpaid journals and time to review themselves for paid journals.

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